Saturday, January 19, 2008

Not Golfer's Elbow

Yesterday I tried to do a personal training session at the gym, but my trainer stopped it early because I was feeling pain on the muscles inside my elbow. I just ran on the elliptical machine instead.

I did a very brief check online of pain on the inside of the elbow, and saw something called "golfer's elbow," but the illustration doesn't look like where I was hurting. Then I saw tendonitis of the biceps, which makes sense to me--the pain seems to be where the biceps connect to the inside of the elbow. Many of the references were about the connection to the shoulder, but there were some referring to the elbow, too.

There's also an article about "distal biceps tendon rupture," which, according to the about.com article:

is usually an injury that occurs with heavy lifting or sports in middle-aged men. Most patients with a distal biceps rupture will have surgery to repair the torn tendon.

It's times like this that I hate the Internet.

I don't think I have a dbp, I didn't hear anything snap. Whatever it is, the likely cause is the insane push-up session we went through Thursday night at martial arts class. It's what you get when a 20-something athlete of a black belt stands in to run the class.

4 comments:

John Vesia said...

About 6 years ago I was doing curls in my basement when I heard something tear. As it turns out I tore the fascia on my left biceps. I felt the pain right inside the elbow where the muscle inserts near the joint. The fascia is a sheath that covers the muscle, but I incurred no damage to anything else. The doctor called it golfer's elbow and with a little rehab I was alright.

BobSpar said...

Thanks, John, I'm glad it healed quickly. If I'm still hurting in a week or two I'll go to the doctor.

Blackbeltmama said...

It feels never ending doesn't it? I had whiplash in the summer from karate, then a sore wrist from a joint lock, and then the ACL business.

Hope it settles down and is nothing.

BobSpar said...

Thanks, BBM. I think I'm avoiding or minimizing cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other ills of modern sedentary life, but in return we get all these sports injuries.