Sunday, November 11, 2007

Sleep, Weight

I expected that when I started exercising regularly, my weight would drop back to the 190-pound area where I was when I was in peak condition.

However, my weight has remained steady or, if anything, climbed just a bit. I weighed in this morning at 197.5 pounds. In my school's tournaments, that would put me in the division right below heavyweight, which is 205 pounds and up; in most kickboxing organizations, it would be called "cruiserweight" or "super cruiserweight."

Given that I'm sweating buckets with every martial arts class, I'm hoping that at least part of the weight gain is from new muscle as a result of the private gym sessions, complete with resistance/weight training, I've been getting. I'm not lifting super heavy weights for large muscles, but smaller weights at high repetitions, which I think would be more appropriate for kickboxing. The focus is also to bolster some muscles in my back that aren't getting workouts with things like push-ups.

It's not like I haven't been training. I trained twice a day for a couple of the days I was off from work this week.

One sign, I guess, of hard work is that when I can sleep as late as I want, my sleep time is increasing to nine hours from eight, even when I think I've gotten enough sleep during the week.

I can't, given my schedule, sleep for nine hours work nights. That would mean getting home at about 7, then going to sleep at 9:00--a full two hours at home and awake. I don't think so. And on nights I go to martial arts class, it would mean dropping off to sleep with 15 minutes left in class. Nope.

2 comments:

FamKick said...

Hello,

Just a thought on weights for kickboxing,

When we train for a fight we do high weight but only the last quarter of the movement, so say we were doing bench press, only the last top quarter of the full contraction is what we do, the reason being is that the average person doesnt lack the muscle, they simply lack the last 100 percent contraction which will give maximum power,without gaining weight.

Have a good one,
www.familykickboxing.homestead.com
Al

BobSpar said...

Thanks, Al, that's interesting. I'm curious where you stand on high-weight, low-rep versus lower weight, higher rep when it comes to kickboxing.

Interesting looking school.

BobSpar